Thursday, June 29, 2006

Gimmel Tammuz

This evening ends Gimmel Tammuz, the 3rd day of the month of Tammuz of the year 5766; it is the Lubavitcher Rebbe's (zt"l) 12th yartzheit.

Since I don't have the proper words to express the significance of the day, here is an excerpt from a post on CrownHeights.info:
Gimmel Tammuz is an interesting occasion. The day officially marks an end to the Rebbe's lifetime. But reality tells a different story. Through brief glances around the world, into Chabad activities (and peoples' lives) - a different picture emerges. There are countless continued stories, actions taken, lives changing, and growing achievements connected to the Rebbe's life, making it quite artificial to acknowledge that there can be any sort of end connected to the Rebbe. When the Zohar wrote that a Tzaddik is more in the world after his passing than during his lifetime, he wasn't joking around.

Gimmel Tammuz is a celebration of an extraordinary kind.

On Gimmel Tammuz, the Rebbe was not laid to rest;– he became more vibrant.

On Gimmel Tammuz, the Rebbe didn't leave us behind; he moved us forward.

On Gimmel Tammuz, the Rebbe didn't reveal his mark on the world; he was just beginning.

On Gimmel Tammuz, the Rebbe gave us a world with nothing untouched by his genius, his warmth, his vision. There is no area in life where one cannot turn to the Rebbe for his wisdom and advice. There is no way to avoid his insightful, tangible and relevant lessons. They make a home wherever you go. They find you wherever you are.

To see the Rebbe today is not a matter of memories. While telling stories and reading the Rebbe's works is central to understanding the Rebbe's lifetime, we should not settle with the past. We need not struggle and search to find the Rebbe. On Gimmel Tammuz, he gave us a very personal gift. He gave us the gift of himself, unlimited. All we need to do is tune in. All we need to do is look around.

Original post.
Gimmel Tammuz has already ended in New York, where the Rebbe is buried. However, there is a tradition to send letters to the Rebbe for "guidance and intervention On High." To send a letter to the Rebbe via the internet (which will be printed out and torn up at the Rebbe's gravesite), click here; it is appropriate to do so throughout the year, not only on Gimmel Tammuz.

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